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12 Awesome Formative Assessment Examples
posted by: Melissa | November 17, 2015, 11:53 AM   

 

Finding new and unique ideas for formative assessments is always a struggle.  However, the team over at the Global Digital Citizen Foundation has some ideas in the following blog, originally posted on their site last April.

Formative assessment tools used in the classroom provide critical feedback to teachers, helping them to monitor and modify their instruction methods and lesson plans. Teachers are better able to meet the unique needs of individual students, empowering them through personalized and timely feedback.

 

It’s important to use a variety of teaching and learning formative assessments, changing them frequently to stimulate both students and teachers. Assessment techniques are only as limited as the teacher’s imagination!

Here are 12 awesome formative assessment examples that we like. These ideas are very creative, low tech, fun and engaging for students, and easy for a teacher to implement right away.

 

1) Postcards From the Past

Have students adopt the personality of a historical figure and write a postcard to another historical figure from the same era, discussing a significant event that has just occurred.


2) Collage or Poster

Ask students to make a collage or poster from magazine photos to demonstrate understanding of a concept.


3) Journal

Students periodically record their thoughts and feelings about how they are progressing in the class. They can also share feelings about particular assignments or indicate areas in which they may be experiencing difficulties in the classroom, either with the material, the teacher, or their classmates.


4) Doodle

Challenge students to use a drawing rather than words to show understanding of a concept.


5) Caption Photos

Choose three photos that represent a process. Ask students to caption each photo.

6) Metacognition Table

At the end of class, each student answers the following questions presented to them on index cards:

  • What did we do in class?
  • Why did we do it?
  • What did I learn today?
  • How can I apply it?
  • What questions do I have about it?


7) Four Corners

This is a great way to encourage dynamic movement while learning multiple-choice questions. Designate each corner of the classroom to represent A, B, C, and D. Students go to the corner that they believe corresponds with the correct answer.


8) Vote with Thumbs

Ask the class if they understand a concept. A thumbs up is “yes”, thumbs down is “no,” and “not sure,” is thumbs middle.


9) Stop & Go Cards

Students create index cards with a large green marker circle on one side and red on the other. If they are following along and understanding the lesson, the green side of their card is upright and visible to you. When they do not understand something and need clarification, they flip the card to show you the red side.

Here is an alternative method that can be downloaded for free and printed on colored card stock for quick use.


10) Twitter Board

Students summarize what was learned in a lesson using 140 characters. Pin small strips of paper to a poster or corkboard to resemble a Twitter feed.


11) Roll the Die

Put a die at each desk. At the end of class, each student rolls and briefly answers aloud a question based on the number rolled:

  1. I want to remember …
  2. Something I learned today
  3. One word to sum up what I learned
  4. Something I already knew
  5. I’m still confused about …
  6. An “aha” moment that I had today


12) Enthusiasm and Learning Formative Assessment Example Chart

This chart is great for not only collecting feedback, but also introducing scatter plots to students. Students rank what they learned that day and how much they enjoyed the lessons. They then elaborate on a Post-It, offering details about what they found helpful to them in having a successful learning day. They can also share what prevented them from having a fulfilling day. Compile the data and discuss it in class the next day.

Hopefully these creative formative assessment examples have inspired you to devise your own engaging assessment tools! Let us know which methods you find to be the most fun and valuable.

 

 

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