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Member Spotlight: How Allyson White's AAE Classroom Grant Made the Difference
posted by: Alana | November 08, 2016, 03:12 pm   

Considering applying for an AAE Teacher Scholarship or Classroom Grant but not sure how to put your ideas on paper? Here's an example of a past winner whose award made all the difference for her students.

 

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What Makes a Great Science Teacher?
posted by: Alana | November 02, 2016, 03:46 pm   

 

After recently winning the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, I was asked what makes a great science teacher. Wow, what a question! Not sure I can sum it all up in one article because there is so much that goes into being a great teacher.

 

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Reform Matters: October 28, 2016
posted by: Alana | October 28, 2016, 06:48 pm   
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Where do the presidential candidates stand on education?
posted by: Alana | October 28, 2016, 12:08 pm   

 

We're getting down to the wire and early voting is already in full swing across the nation. There is so much at stake in this presidential race from education reform initiatives to school funding, yet thousands of Americans are still undecided heading into the 2016 elections. It's absolutely imperative that educators make well informed decisions at the voting booth this November.    

 

AAE is proudly non-partisan, does not endorse candidates, or tell members how to vote.  We do, however, urge each and every educator to brush up on the candidates' stances on education at the federal, state, AND local levels before heading to the polls.  

 

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Using Classroom Observations to Promote Teacher Self-Efficacy: A Teacher's Perspective
posted by: Alana | October 26, 2016, 09:53 am   

Guest Post by Terry Pearson

 

During my teaching career in England, which has spanned more than 30 years, I have been very privileged to visit in excess of one thousand teachers, in a wide variety of settings, to observe them at work in their classrooms. Recently though, from what I have read about and even seen the way classroom observations are being deployed in schools and other education and training organizations across the globe, I suspect that America’s teachers are getting pretty used to a ‘litmus-paper’ approach to classroom observation. By this I mean an observer dips into a lesson, or watches a short video of a lesson, and uses a record of what was noticed to form a judgement as to where the teacher, or the lesson, sits within a pre-determined cluster of ratings or categories. I use this terminology as this method of observation can be likened to that of briefly dipping a piece of litmus paper into a solution and using the resulting color of the paper to determine the strength of acidity or alkalinity of the solution.

 

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